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The Corn Hole Cave

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At first glance, cornhole seems like such an easy game. All you have to do is throw a beanbag at a slanted board that has a hole near the top of it. Hit enough of those throws to get to 21 points before your opponent and victory is yours.

Dominating the game in your backyard at your average Fourth of July cookout could bring to mind visions of becoming a professional cornhole player. How hard could it be? But if you think you have what it takes to compete at that level, it’s worth considering all of the elements you will have to master to take that next step. Maybe you’re destined to stay put in your neighborhood after all.

Pro equipment

According to the American Cornhole League (ACL) rules, a cornhole board must meet a wide variety of standards before it can be approved for use in one of its tournaments. For instance, the board has to be made of wood (typically birch, oak or maple), must have a finished coat with a smooth texture and must weigh at least 15 pounds.

These parameters alone would preclude the use of a very high percentage of recreational boards, as most of those are made out of some form of particleboard and fail to meet the weight requirement. If a board is too light or flimsy, it will cause the bags to bounce when they hit and thus make it very difficult for players to land their throws accurately. Davis Streker and Rob Chismark, owners of the board and bag supplier Board Men Cornhole, might have put it best when they said, “The best types of boards are so sturdy that they feel like they are part of the earth.”

The typical recreational cornhole bag is composed of only one type of material, can vary greatly in size depending on where it is purchased and is often filled with either corn or rocks. Professional-caliber cornhole bags, however, have to meet stringent size and weight requirements and must be filled with plastic resin.

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